PHYS 215G – Engineering Physics I

General Information

Lecture prerequisite:  MATH 191G ( Calculus and Analytical Geometry).
Venue: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 09:30-10:20, GD Hall 230
Instructor: Professor Edwin Fohtung
office: GD Hall 259A, email: efohtung@nmsu.edu, office hours: Tuesdays 15:00-16:00, otherwise you may arrange a meeting by appointment.
Teaching Assistant: TBA
Textbook: Young & Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics, 13th edition, Addison Wesley (required)

 

Course Overview

Calculus-level treatment of kinematics, work and energy, particle dynamics, conservation principles, simple harmonic motion. Prerequisite(s): MATH 191G. The aim of the course is to familiarize the student with concepts and methods used to find a workable description of the physical world. We cover the main principles of mechanics and show how these principles can be applied to solve real-world problems. Understanding of the concepts is stressed more than memorization of mathematical formulas, and the meaning behind the formulas is explained. The students are expected to develop quantitative and qualitative scientific reasoning skills and to acquire knowledge to approach problems found in engineering and scientific applications. See objectives at  http://assessment.nmsu.edu

It is quite important to do exercises and assignments, in order to digest notions and methods in engineering physics learned in the lectures. The assignments are not only used to help you understand the material but also to give you a broader insight from into the subject.

Grading Weighting: You may bring a calculator and one handwritten A4 letter-size sheet with any notes and equations you fit on it. No books, laptop computers, smart phones, etc. or any other print or electronic media are allowed in quizzes and exams
The final grade will be determined by the following weighing:

Homework                                      20%
Quizzes                                           20%
Midterm Exam                                25%
Final Comprehensive Exam            35%

TOTAL:                                        100%

Their problems will be largely selected from the problems found at the end of chapters and those discussed during the lectures.

Quizzes: There will be three classroom quizzes, with the lowest quiz grade being dropped. There are no makeup quizzes unless you have a medical doctor’s note or you are absent on university business.
Exams:  There will be two exams during the semester (see the schedule for dates) one midterm and one final comprehensive exam. There are no makeup exams.

 

Syllabus & Tentative Schedule

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Intermediate Modern Physics I

General Information

Lecture Info: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:20-11:35, GD Hall 218A
The prerequisites are PHY 315 (Modern Physics),  and MATH 392 (Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations).
Office Hours: Wednesday, 15:00-16:00, otherwise you may arrange a meeting by appointment.
Instructor Info: Professor Edwin Fohtung
office: GD Hall 259A, email: efohtung@nmsu.edu
Teaching Assistant: TBA
Textbook: J. S. Townsend, “A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics,” 2nd Edition (required)

 

Course Overview

This is an upper-division course for quantum mechanics, and continues to PHY 455 “Intermediate Quantum Mechanics II”. As seen in the syllabus, the basics of quantum mechanics are taught in a self-contained manner. The course is suitable for undergraduate or graduate students who like to obtain comprehensive understanding of quantum theory and to master its mathematical treatments from scratch. In case you do not satisfy the above prerequisites, you may still discuss a registration with the instructor.

It is quite important to do exercises and assignements, in order to digest notions and methods in quantum mechanics learned in the lectures. The assignments are not only used to help you understand the material but also to give you a broader insight from into the subject.

The final grade will be determined based on performance of mid-term exams and assignments (their weights are 65 % and 35 % respectively, for now). Their problems will be largely selected from the problems found at the end of chapters. Each mid-term exam is arranged after every chapter is completed. That is how you can study rather narrow, clearly-defined selections of materials for every exam, while they are still fresh in your mind. Overall it is expected that your learning is more effective and at the same time the load by the course is less stressful this way.

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Syllabus

We plan to cover a good part of the textbook over the course of the semesters (Fall 2014). If time permits, I will explain briefly recent research activities related to quantum mechanics, quantum electronics and quantum information.

1. Stern-Gerlach experiments [Lecture note on the chapter 1]

2. Rotation of basis states and matrix mechanics [Lecture note on the chapter 2]

3. Angular momentum [Lecture note on the chapter 3]

4. Time evolution [Lecture note on the chapter 4]

6. Wave mechanics in one dimension [Lecture note on the chapter 6]

7. The one-dimensional harmonic oscillator [Lecture note on the chapter 7]

5. A system of two spin-1/2 particles [Lecture note on the chapter 5]

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Tentative Schedule

Thursday: TH,
Tuesday: TU

Dates Subject Home Work/Exams
Aug. 21,TH 1 Stern-Gerlach experiments: 1.1
Aug. 26,TU 1 Stern-Gerlach experiments: 1.2
Aug. 28,TH 1 Stern-Gerlach experiments – The Quantum state vector: 1.3
Sep. 02, TU 1 Stern-Gerlach experiments: 1.4-1.5 Assignment 1 is posted
Sep. 04, TH
Sep. 09, TU
Sep. 11, TH 2. Rotation and matrix mechanics 2.1-2.2
Sep. 16, TU 2. Rotation and matrix mechanics 2.1-2.2
Sep. 18, TH 2. Rotation and matrix mechanics 2.2
Sep. 23, TU 2. Rotation and matrix mechanics 2.3-2.4
Sep. 25, TH 2. Rotation and matrix mechanics 2.5-2.6
Sep. 30, TU 2. Rotation and matrix mechanics 2.6-2.7
Oct. 02, TH 2. Rotation and matrix mechanics 2.7-2.8
Oct. 07, TU 3. Angular momentum 3.1-3.2
Oct. 09, TH 3. Angular momentum 3.3
Oct. 14, TU 3. Angular momentum 3.3
Oct. 16, TH 3. Angular momentum 3.4-3.5
Oct. 21, TU 3. Angular momentum 3.6
Oct. 23, TH 3. Angular momentum 3.6-3.7
Oct. 28, TU 4. Time evolution 4.1
Oct. 30, TH 4. Time evolution 4.2-4.3
Nov.04, TU 4. Time evolution 4.3
Nov.06, TH 4. Time evolution 4.4
Nov.11, TU 4. Time evolution 4.4-4.5
Nov.13, TH 4. Time evolution 4.5-4.6
Nov.18, TU 6. Wave mechanics in one dimension: 6.1
Nov.20, TH 6. Wave mechanics in one dimension: 6.1-6.2
Nov.25-27 THANKS GIVING HOLIDAY
Nov.27, TH THANKS GIVING HOLIDAY
Dec.02, TU
Dec.04, TH
Dec.09, TU
Dec.11, TH

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Assignments

Students may study subjects of assignments together, but everyone is expected to prepare his/her original answer sheets.

1. Assignment due on Sep. 9 (Mon) [Problems: 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 1.8 Solutions]

2. Assignment due on Sep. 23 (Mon) [Reading the section 2.7 and Problems: 2.8, 2.13, 2.16, 2.24 Solutions]

3. Assignment due on Oct. 7 (Mon) [Problems: 3.5, 3.7, 3.17, 3.19 Solutions]

4. Assignment due on Oct. 28 (Mon) [Problems: 4.4, 4.8, 4.11, 4.13 Solutions]

6. Assignment due on Nov. 11 (Mon) [Problems: 6.2, 6.4, 6.15, 6.23 Solutions]

7. Assignment due on Nov. 25 (Mon) [Problems: 7.4, 7.9, 7.13, 7.23 Solutions]

5. Assignment due on Dec. 13 (Fri) [Problems: 5.3, 5.5, 5.13, 5.17 Solutions]

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Exams

Students may study subjects of assignments together, but everyone is expected to prepare his/her original answer sheets.

1. Assignment due on Sep. 9 (Mon) [Problems: 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 1.8 Solutions]

2. Assignment due on Sep. 23 (Mon) [Reading the section 2.7 and Problems: 2.8, 2.13, 2.16, 2.24 Solutions]

3. Assignment due on Oct. 7 (Mon) [Problems: 3.5, 3.7, 3.17, 3.19 Solutions]

4. Assignment due on Oct. 28 (Mon) [Problems: 4.4, 4.8, 4.11, 4.13 Solutions]

6. Assignment due on Nov. 11 (Mon) [Problems: 6.2, 6.4, 6.15, 6.23 Solutions]

7. Assignment due on Nov. 25 (Mon) [Problems: 7.4, 7.9, 7.13, 7.23 Solutions]

5. Assignment due on Dec. 13 (Fri) [Problems: 5.3, 5.5, 5.13, 5.17 Solutions]